Friday, September 15, 2006

SCARY THIRTEEN RINGING OF THE BARDS

Superstition

Turn to the horror of himself, look at deep within
He knows there is a growing burden, He is guilty
If he hadn’t done what he shouldn’t do, no problem,
But he had to; no one takes care of you but yourself.
Steal that candy, break that toy, nobody will see it.
Don’t worry if they catch you, you can lie (as always).
God smiles at him from heaven, he is completely free,
Take that money, he knows he wants what they won’t give him;
Life passes into the hands of the greedy and quick.

The burden builds like a dangerous house with a short,
He can never relax because it’s all coming down.
He looks to the sky and thinks with a frown, no one home.
What there he sees is a reflection of him – snake eyes.

20 comments:

Aurora said...

Wow, Russell! Good write! Reminds me of a snake or two.

Russell Ragsdale said...

Thanks Aurora! Glad (I guess) for the reminder and I'm pleased you liked this rather dour work.

abhay said...

Hi Russell,
your poem reminds me of Judas who betrayed Jesus for money...but thats just symbolic..the story of betrayal goes on..
Your writing is splendid!

Russell Ragsdale said...

Yeh, Judas was a piece of work! This poem is about the root of superstition which I believe is guilt, and the accompanying fear which makes us look at everything as if it was a sign. Thanks for the kind words. Your poem was wonderful, I enjoyed it very much!

Pat Paulk said...

"Paranoia runs deep"!! Some know it well, and never recognize it in themselves. Another great one!!

Russell Ragsdale said...

Thanks Pat! Glad you liked it. Me, I'm just still dizzy from your tiny Red Barrons.

gulnaz said...

OMG!
this was reallly really good! simple, direct and tight and so so relevant. loved it!

Russell Ragsdale said...

Thanks Gulnaz for such an enthusiastic comment! I'm really glad you enjoyed it and thanks for making me feel so good.

Jo Janoski said...

The snakes eyes of guilt, perfectly explained!

Russell Ragsdale said...

Thanks Jo! Luck, guilt, and omen-like occurences are especially difficult to deal with in an injust and Godless world. Thanks for your perceptive comment!

csperez said...

yeah, great piece!

Russell Ragsdale said...

Thanks csperez! Glad you came to check it out.

_Soulless_ said...

Loved the metaphors of the 'house' and the 'home'... That second stanza made me sit right up at the end of my chair. ^_^ A poem that ends with a bang. Cheers.

Russell Ragsdale said...

Thanks soulless! Thanks for mentioning the building tension part of the poem. Glad to know that part worked. And thanks for the great comment!

Natalia L. Rudychev said...

Excellent write! I like condensed nature of this poem. The tension builds and culminates in a punch at the end.

M. Shahin said...

A very interesting poem to read. A lot of tension and mystery throughout.

I'll be back in the future.

Russell Ragsdale said...

Thanks Natalia! Glad you enjoyed this and have come to leave your wonderful, wise comments busy as ants at a sugar spill.

Russell Ragsdale said...

Hi m. shahin! Thanks for the nice, interesting and helpful comments. I'll be looking forward to your visits.

Sue hardy-Dawson said...

I particularly like the last line it provides a sudden shock immage in the lulling of the conciense healing its self

Russell Ragsdale said...

Thanks Sue! I'm glad you liked that forced moment of recognition.